The Wolf Border

The Wolf Border

The Wolf Border

Sarah Hall

Pages: 432 / Audiobook: 13 hrs 14 mins
Published June 9th 2015 by Harper

The award-winning author of The Electric Michelangelo returns with her first novel in nearly six years, a literary masterpiece about the reintroduction of wild wolves into the United Kingdom.

She hears them howling along the buffer zone, a long harmonic.
One leading, then many.
At night there is no need to imagine, no need to dream.
They reign outside the mind.

Rachel Caine is a zoologist working in Nez Perce, Idaho, as part of a wolf recovery project. She spends her days, and often nights, tracking the every move of a wild wolf pack—their size, their behavior, their howl patterns. It is a fairly solitary existence, but Rachel is content.

When she receives a call from the wealthy and mysterious Earl of Annerdale, who is interested in reintroducing the grey wolf to Northern England, Rachel agrees to a meeting. She is certain she wants no part of this project, but the Earl's estate is close to the village where Rachel grew up, and where her aging mother now lives in a care facility. It has been far too long since Rachel has gone home, and so she returns to face the ghosts of her past.

The Wolf Border is a breathtaking story about the frontier of the human spirit, from one of the most celebrated young writers working today.


Novel Gobblers Perspective

Carol's Rating:  ★★

Meatloaf & Potatoes not Steak and Lobster

And bland meatloaf and potatoes at that. This is not to say that the writing is not beautiful or that the story is not interesting, because it is. But it is in an everyday, matter of fact, plodding, monotone, deliberate way. I can see the brilliance of the symbolism between Racheal and the wolves; the need for freedom rather than captivity. It is clear that Rachael is a lone wolf, dedicated and loyal to her cause, yet the story did not allow me to connect with the characters at all. It was devoid of emotion. Any interaction with others is told briefly or completely skipped. Thomas Pendleton's actions near the end were a complete surprise to me and were the most exciting part of the story. I wanted so badly to love this book but the characters were kept at such a distance that it sadly prevented me from having anything beyond a flatline experience.

What Does It Mean?

The Wolf Border is full of vocabulary-building words. Here's just a few of them and their definitions.

  • encomium - [en-koh-mee-uh m] noun, plural encomiums, encomia; a formal expression of high praise; eulogy.
  • connubial - [kuh-noo-bee-uhl] adjective; of marriage or wedlock; matrimonial; conjugal: connubial love.
  • copse - [kops] noun; a thicket of small trees or bushes; a small wood.
  • tannoynoun; trademark a sound-amplifying apparatus used as a public-address system esp in a large building
  • pedant - [ped-nt] noun
    • 1. A person who makes an excessive or inappropriate display of learning
    • 2. A person who overemphasizes rules or minor details 
    • 3. A person who adheres rigidly to book knowledge without regard tocommon sense.
    • 4. Obsolete. a schoolmaster.

 

 

Have you learned some new words lately?  Share them at Wondrous Words Wednesday (hosted by Bermudaonion.net). “Wondrous Words Wednesday is a weekly meme where we share new (to us) words that we’ve encountered in our reading.”

Happy Reading!

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The Last of the Bandit Riders…Revisited

The Last of the Bandit Riders…Revisited

Last of the Bandit Riders ... Revisited

Matt Warner

Pages: 186
Published November 1st 2000 by Big Moon Traders

One of the classic biographies of a western outlaw, LAST OF THE BANDIT RIDERS has been reprinted in a large trade edition, with dozens of photographs, maps, newspaper accounts and letters added to the original text. The book features a letter written by Butch Cassidy and sent to Matt Warner along with three photographs in 1937, providing a convincing argument that Butch returned from South America and lived out his life in the United States.


Novel Gobblers Perspective

Carol's Rating:  ★★★★★

Marvelous True Tales of the Old West

I loved this book. It is full of photographs, letters, maps, documents, and exciting recollections of nostalgic times in the Old West. It reads like a collection of tall tales but they are confirmed true events in history.

A man who has had an outlaw past is never safe, no matter how straight he goes afterwards. That's the price he pays. Something out of his past life may raise up against him and wreck his life any time."

Willard Erastus Christiansen, alias Matt Warner, was born on April 12, 1864 in Price, Utah and gives us his personal account of living the outlaw life when horses were the major mode of transportation. He tells of:

  • his adventurous exploits from cattle rustling to robbing banks to train holdups and dynamiting safes with outlaw friends that include Butch Cassidy and Tom McCarty
  • near death brushes with the law
  • marriage and children and attempts to leave the outlaw life and how past wrong deeds follow a man, making it nearly impossible to lead an honest life
  • navigating a rapidly changing world that includes railroads and telegraphs; where money and lawyers can save your skin better than a jailbreak can
  • dealings with corrupt lawmen and honest lawmen and what it takes to reform a bandit
  • touching relationships inside and outside the law
  • what became of his outlaw friends and most particularly, that Butch Cassidy did not die in South America but returned to the USA and lived a long life
  • of keeping a vow to live an honest life and doing so for nearly 40 years as "one of the best Deputy Sheriffs, police officers, and Justices of the Peace Carbon County has ever known."

This is a rousing, extraordinary look at life on the wrong side of the law during the late 1800's that stretches from Utah to Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, Wyoming, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington. It is a marvelous piece of our regional history.

Historic Photos, Maps, and More

mattwarner-16

Willard Erastus Christianson, alias Matt Warner, age 16, 1880

 

butch

Robert LeRoy Parker, alias Butch Cassidy,  Parker was born 15 April 1866 in Beaver, Utah, and was raised by Mormon pioneer parents on a ranch near Circleville, Utah

 

mattwarnerprisoner

While they were charged with first-degree murder, Matt Warner and Bill Wall were convicted only of manslaughter

robbersroost

Robbers Roost was a popular outlaw hideout for over 30 years

 

vernal

Main Street of Vernal, Utah, c. 1900, several years after Matt Warner and Bill Wall were threatened with vigilante justice. To protect the prisoners, they were removed from jail and taken overland to Carter, where they boarded the westbound train. They were taken to Ogden, where they were tried for the killings.

mattwarnerstraight

From January 21, 1900, until his death on December 21, 1938, Matt Warner stayed within the bounds of the law.

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Discussion Questions

  1. What did you learn from reading this book?
  2. Was there anything that you found surprising?
  3. Was there something in the book that you related to?
  4. Were there specific passages that struck you as significant—or interesting, profound, amusing, illuminating, disturbing, sad…? What was memorable?
  5. What do you think Matt Warner's overall message was throughout this book?
  6. Do you believe that Butch Cassidy returned to the US and lived a long life?
  7. What happened to Matt Warner's first daughter, Hayda?
  8. Have you visited any of the areas along the Outlaw Trail?
  9. Would you recommend this book to others? Why?
Happy Reading!

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Big Stone Gap

Big Stone Gap

Big Stone Gap

Adriana Trigiani

Pages: 320 / Audio book: 11 hrs 25 min
Ballantine Books; 1st Thus. edition (April 3, 2001)

Nestled in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, the tiny town of Big Stone Gap is home to some of the most charming eccentrics in the state. Ave Maria Mulligan is the town's self-proclaimed spinster, a thirty-five year old pharmacist with a "mountain girl's body and a flat behind." She lives an amiable life with good friends and lots of hobbies until the fateful day in 1978 when she suddenly discovers that she's not who she always thought she was. Before she can blink, Ave's fielding marriage proposals, fighting off greedy family members, organizing a celebration for visiting celebrities, and planning the trip of a lifetime-a trip that could change her view of the world and her own place in it forever.


Novel Gobblers Perspective

Carol's Rating:  ★★★

The first time I heard of this book was when I saw the movie trailer. I love it when movies are made from books; it's fun to compare the differences and discover what I like or don't in each.  I found it to be a light, fun story and I enjoyed the quirky characters and small town setting. The story was a bit sappy and unrealistic at times and I tired of how wishy-washy the main character was but that is part of what makes her so lovable. As for the movie, well, this is one of the few times that I enjoyed the movie more than I did the book. If you don't take things too seriously, the characters and story will make you laugh and warm your heart. 

 

Official Movie Trailer

Released in 2015, Big Stone Gap is a romantic comedy with an All-Star cast including Ashley Judd, Patrick Wilson, and Whoopie Goldberg.

 

 

Happy Reading!

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The Heretic’s Daughter

The Heretic’s Daughter

The Heretic's Daughter

Kathleen Kent

Pages: 332 pages / Audio book: 10 hrs 6 min
Published September 3, 2008 by Little, Brown and Company

Martha Carrier was one of the first women to be accused, tried and hanged as a witch in Salem, Massachusetts. Like her mother, young Sarah Carrier is bright and willful, openly challenging the small, brutal world in which they live. Often at odds with one another, mother and daughter are forced to stand together against the escalating hysteria of the trials and the superstitious tyranny that led to the torture and imprisonment of more than 200 people accused of witchcraft. This is the story of Martha's courageous defiance and ultimate death, as told by the daughter who survived.

Kathleen Kent is a tenth generation descendant of Martha Carrier. She paints a haunting portrait, not just of Puritan New England, but also of one family's deep and abiding love in the face of fear and persecution.


Novel Gobblers Perspective

Carol's Rating:  ★★★

 
An Artful, Thought-Provoking Read

If you're looking for an alternative to WWII historical fiction and something that will stay with you for weeks after you've finished reading it, this might be the book for you. It will definitely make you thankful for medicine and life in the 21st century!

Kathleen Kent writes beautifully. The language is near poetic at times as it paints a vivid picture of 17th century life in Salem, Massachusetts. Mare Winingham lends a perfect voice to the audiobook and truly captures the character's emotions and personalities. Daily life itself is a struggle to provide food and shelter for the family let alone surviving diseases and even worse, being shunned by the community and imprisoned for false accusations of witchcraft. Much of the book is about the family members and their relationships. A stern mother, a father that rarely speaks, a brother that is mentally handicapped, a rift in the family between the parents and the aunt and uncle - the people are hard and their lives seem even harder. That is what stands out to me; that life was very difficult and there did not seem to be very much joy for any of them. They endured many hardships and were steadfastly devoted to their loved ones.

The story moves at a rather slow, determined pace, yet it held my attention from the start to the end. I found it astounding that gossip and slander was adequate proof for the law to imprison and sentence the accused to their deaths. I found it astounding that people could live with themselves, all the while knowing that they were directly responsible for inflicting such grief and devastation to others. I was astonished by the superstitious hysteria that swept through the region and the hypocrisy of it all when the accusers pleadingly turned to accused to ask for miracles. Yet in all my astonishment I am reminded, now well over 3 centuries later, with all our culture and education, that in many ways people have not changed that much. Though events and circumstances change, human nature remains the same.

Happy Reading!

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The Dig

The Dig

The Dig

Matt Turner Series Book 1

Michael Siemsen

Pages: 378 pages / Audio book: 10 hrs 31 min
Published September 1st 2015 by Fantome Publishing

A mysterious woven metal artifact is found at a paleontological dig in Africa. Mystified experts, confounded by the impossible timeline they get from traditional dating methods, call upon a stubborn young man with a unique talent. Matthew Turner's gift is also his curse: Whenever he touches an object, his awareness is flooded with the thoughts and feelings of those who touched it before him. It's a talent that many covet, some fear, and almost no one understands.

Despite being exploited as a child and tormented by the unpleasant experiences imprinted on him from the various items he has "read," Matthew agrees to travel from New York to the forests of Kenya. There, threatened by unknown enemies and helped by a beautiful but prickly ally who begins to understand his strange ability, he journeys back in geological time to make a discovery so shocking that it forces us to rewrite all human history.


Novel Gobblers Perspective

Carol's Rating:  ★★

The premise of this story is great; discovering ancient artifacts, unveiling ancient cultures, psychic powers, Africa, intrigue,  mystery, and excitement.  The story starts out well but to my disappointment, it and the characters turned out to be - well, it all turned out to be dreadfully flat. I had such high hopes for this book but the lack of depth and development left me rather unsatisfied.  

Happy Reading!

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Vulcan’s Forge

Vulcan’s Forge

Vulcan's Forge

Jack Du Brul

Pages: 372
Published December 6th 2005 by NAL (first published January 1st 1998)

It begins deep beneath the Pacific Ocean, where a nuclear bomb strikes at the fiery hot heart of the earth. Churning, spewing boiling lava, a volcano rises with unnatural speed from the ocean floor -- the source of a new mineral that promises clean, limitless nuclear power.
It continues in hot spots around the globe: Hawaii, where a secessionist movement is about to turn violent and the American army may be asked to fire on U.S. citizens; Washington, D.C., where the subway system becomes the site of a running gun battle; the Far East, where disrupted diplomatic negotiations jeopardize world peace; a rogue Russian submarine, circling the infant volcano.

Caught in the middle is Philip Mercer, a geologist and a one-time commando with shady contacts in all the right (or is it wrong?) places. When Mercer learns that the daughter of an old friend is being kept under armed guard in a local hospital, he vows to rescue her, not knowing that this is the first step in unraveling the fantastic secrets of Vulcan's Forge.


Novel Gobblers Perspective

Carol's Rating:  ★★★

 

Happy Reading!

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Carol’s Progress

Carol’s Progress

Carol's Book Nerd Challenge Progress

50 Books ~ 50 Categories ~ by December 17, 2016

IFPL tote

Because I seriously want to earn this nerdy green bag!

 

Challenge Categories (downloadable pdf)

 

1

Book Club in a Box

jonasJonasson

 5

A Biography

 9

A Book with a Continuing Character

13

A Book with Food in the Title

17

A YA/Adult Fiction Crossover

21

A Book Set in the Country of One of My Ancestors

2

Book About Best Friends

 6

By or About an Explorer

10

A Book about a Hobby

 
 
 
14

A Book Published Before 1850

18

A Book Set in this Region

22

About Someone with the Same Job as Me

3

Retelling of a Classic

7

With an Animal in the Title

11

A Book with a Mode of Transportation in the Title

15

A National Book Award Winner

19

A Sea Story

23

A Lion, Witch, or Wardrobe

4

A Book with a Blue Cover

 8

A Book of Historical Fiction

12

Written by Someone Over the Age of 65

16

A Book by an Author from Asia

20

A Non-Fiction Book

24

A Book About a Sport

Take a breath - we're halfway there....

25

A Time-Travel Book

29

A Book with a Heroine

33

A Guilty Pleasure

37

Recommended by a Librarian

bigstonegap41

Classic Children's Story

 45

Less Than 200 Pages

 49

A Novel in Verse

 
 26

A Book Set in Summer

30

A Science Fiction Book

34

A Book Your Dad Loves

38

Written by a Celebrity

 42

Written by an Idaho Author

46

Read it Again

50

A Book on How To Do Something

 

 27

A Book of Short Stories

 31

An Audio Book

 35

A Book Set in Africa

 39

A Banned Book

The Handmaid's Tale Book Cover

 43

A Book Set During A War

 47

Set During a Holiday

 

 

 
28

An Alternative History Book

32

A Book Published This Year

36

An Event in American History

40

A Book I Own but Haven't Read

44

A Book Rory Gilmore Read

fahrenheit451

48

Non-Fiction with Pictures

The Marvels

The Marvels

The Marvels

Brian Selznick

Pages: 672
Published September 15th 2015 by Scholastic Press

From the Caldecott Medal-winning creator of The Invention of Hugo Cabret and Wonderstruck comes a breathtaking new voyage. In this magnificent reimagining of the form he originated, two stand-alone stories--the first in nearly 400 pages of continuous pictures, the second in prose--create a beguiling narrative puzzle.

The journey begins at sea in 1766, with a boy named Billy Marvel. After surviving a shipwreck, he finds work in a London theatre. There, his family flourishes for generations as brilliant actors until 1900, when young Leontes Marvel is banished from the stage. Nearly a century later, runaway Joseph Jervis seeks refuge with an uncle in London. Albert Nightingale's strange, beautiful house, with its mysterious portraits and ghostly presences, captivates Joseph and leads him on a search for clues about the house, his family, and the past.

A gripping adventure and an intriguing mystery The Marvels is a loving tribute to the power of story.


Novel Gobblers Perspective

Carol's Rating:  ★★★★

A Magical Jewel of a Book

The Marvels is an absolutely beautiful book all the way around. Its hefty 672 gilded pages felt like an indulgence the moment I picked it up. Then I opened it and the magic began. A majority of the book has no written words but instead, it has intricate sketches readily portraying emotions, plot, and scene of a story that spans 150 years and 5 generations of the Marvel family.

The sketches were my favorite part of the book. Through them you are transported to another time. I was completely captivated by the sketches and the emotions on the faces of the characters. It was a powerful, sentimental experience. So much so that now, even just seeing the book or thinking of it instantaneously evokes the experience again.

I admit the prose portion of the book was not as powerful as the sketches yet it was still intriguing and conjured detailed mental images. The story is easy to follow and the mystery surrounding the Uncle and his home will keep you wanting to know more. Plus, it unveils a surprising, unpredictable twist! True, it is a children’s book but that doesn’t mean it’s any less interesting. In fact, it made it much easier to read and engage with.

The Marvels is a magical jewel of a book for all ages. A wonderful personal read, it would also be a fantastic book to read with the family - leaving all members eager for more and treasuring the moments.

A Glimpse of What's Inside

Happy Reading!

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The Little Ships

The Little Ships

The Little Ships

Alexis Carew Book 3

J.A. Sutherland

Pages: 325 / Audio: 11 hrs 44 min
Published November 8th 2015 by Createspace

Newly commissioned lieutenant, Alexis Carew is appointed into HMS Shrewsbury, a 74-gun ship of the line in New London's space navy. She expects Shrewsbury will be sent into action in the war against Hanover, but instead she finds that she and her new ship are pivotal in a Foreign Office plot to bring the star systems of the French Republic into the war and end the threat of Hanover forever.


Novel Gobblers Perspective

Carol's Rating:  ★★★★

 

Happy Reading!

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Mutineer

Mutineer

Mutineer

Alexis Carew Book 2

J.A. Sutherland

Pages: 280 / Audio: 9 hrs 56 min
Published February 14th 2015 by Createspace

Just as Midshipman Alexis Carew thinks she’s found a place in the Royal Navy, she’s transferred aboard H.M.S. Hermione. Her captain is a Tartar, free with the cat o' nine tails and who thinks girls have no place aboard ship. The other midshipmen in the berth are no better. The only advice she’s offered is to keep her head down and mouth shut – things Alexis is rarely able to do.


Novel Gobblers Perspective

Carol's Rating:  ★★★★

 

Happy Reading!

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Into The Dark

Into The Dark

Into The Dark

Alexis Carew Book 1

J.A. Sutherland

Pages: 250 / Audio: 9 hrs 25 min
Published November 1st 2014 by Createspace

At fifteen, Alexis Carew has to face an age old problem - she's a girl, and only a boy can inherit the family's vast holdings. Her options are few. She must marry and watch a stranger run the lands, or become a penniless tenant and see the lands she so dearly loves sold off. Yet there may be another option, one that involves becoming a midshipman on a shorthanded spaceship with no other women.


Novel Gobblers Perspective

Carol's Rating:  ★★★★★

So you don’t care much for Science Fiction, eh?
This series will change your mind.

Yes, that’s me. I don’t care much for Science Fiction. The robots, the metal, the darkness, the emptiness — it all leaves me cold. Until now. A friend so persistently encouraged me to read this book that I was curious to discover what his enthusiasm for it was all about.

Picture this:

Ships, captains, shipmates, sailing, naval adventures, pirates, enemies, New London, loved ones, action, drama, suspense, and a heroine - ALL SET IN DEEP SPACE.

It’s brilliant, it’s unique, it’s entertaining, and will have you rooting for Alexis in no time as she faces enemies from without and surprisingly from within.

Sutherland’s writing is smooth and adeptly blends the nostalgia of sailing ships with an imaginary yet ocasionally familiar universe. The story grabs you from the start and holds you to the end. Elizabeth Klett’s audio book narration is nothing short of spectacular and brings warmth and personality to the characters in such a way that you feel you know them personally. If you enjoy action, drama, suspense, and characters you can connect with, you’ll want to read this series.

 

Happy Reading!

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The Exploration of the Colorado River and Its Canyons

The Exploration of the Colorado River and Its Canyons

The Exploration of the Colorado River and Its Canyons

John Wesley Powell

Pages: 432 / Audio book: 8 hrs 39 mins
Published May 27th 2003 by Penguin Classics (first published 1895)

The great unknown of the Southwest is conquered by a one-armed man and his crew of adventurers, placing the Colorado River and the Grand Canyon on the map of the American continent. It is a journey no human being had ever made before. Dangerous rapids, narrow canyon walls offering no escape, terrifying river waterfalls, capsized boats, near drowning, lost equipment and disillusioned men are dramatically described by John Wesley Powell, leader of this adventurous party. Powell powerfully describes the spectacular beauty of the landscape, the fascinating lives of the indigenous people and the courageous efforts of the expedition party.

One of the great works of American exploration literature, this account of a scientific expedition forced to survive famine, attacks, mutiny, and some of the most dangerous rapids known to man remains as fresh and exciting today as it was in 1874.

The Exploration of the Colorado River and Its Canyons, recently ranked number four on Adventure magazine’s list of top 100 classics, is legendary pioneer John Wesley Powell’s first-person account of his crew’s unprecedented odyssey along the Green and Colorado Rivers and through the Grand Canyon. A bold foray into the heart of the American West’s final frontier, the expedition was achieved without benefit of modern river-running equipment, supplies, or a firm sense of the region’s perilous topography and the attitudes of the native inhabitants towards whites.


Novel Gobblers Perspective

Carol's Rating:  ★★★★★

I listened to the audio book narrated by Andre Stojka. To be honest, I expected it to be a reading of dull, dry scientific notes pulled from John Wesley Powell's log book. But instead I found it to be an absolutely enthralling experience. This may have been a result of the wonderful narrator whose voice was jovial and pleasant and as full of enthusiasm as if the words were his own. And the words! John Wesley Powell paints spectacular word pictures of the landscape, the geology, the dangers, the hardships and the joys that he and his men encountered on the expedition as well descriptions of Indian cultures, social dynamics of the clans, and re-tellings of a few Indian fables. At times I felt as though I could be sitting 'round the fire with him, completely captivated as he recounted the colorful tales of his grand adventures (and he with only one arm!).  Highly, highly recommended.

 

Happy Reading!

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The Lost Summer of Louisa May Alcott

The Lost Summer of Louisa May Alcott

The Lost Summer of Louisa May Alcott

Kelly O'Connor McNees

Pages: 343 / audiobook: 8 hrs 49 mins
Published April 1st 2010 by Penguin Adult HC/TR

In the bestselling tradition of Loving Frank and March comes a novel for anyone who loves Little Women.

A richly imagined, remarkably written story of the woman who created Little Women- and how love changed her in ways she never expected.

Deftly mixing fact and fiction, Kelly O'Connor McNees returns to the summer of 1855, when vivacious Louisa May Alcott is twenty-two and bursting to free herself from family and societal constraints and do what she loves most. Stuck in small-town New Hampshire, she meets Joseph Singer, and as she opens her heart, Louisa finds herself torn between a love that takes her by surprise and her dream of independence as a writer in Boston. The choice she must make comes with a steep price that she will pay for the rest of her life.


Novel Gobblers Perspective

Carol's Rating:  ★★★

I enjoyed learning about Louisa May Alcott's family and friends and the place she grew up. The atmosphere and story felt very much like Little Women and while McNees mixes fact with fiction, this creative story is interesting and plausible. It moves at a nice pace and Louisa's personality rings true to a spirited woman determined to live as she chooses.

 

Happy Reading!

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Mariana

Mariana

Mariana

Susanna Kearsley

Pages: 352 / Audiobook: 11 hrs 20 min
Published August 1st 1995 by Bantam Books (Mm) (first published 1994)

A haunting, paranormal romance from a Romantic Times Readers Choice and RITA Award-winning author, a New York Times and USA Today Bestselling author
When Julia Beckett moves into the beautiful old farmhouse, she soon discovers she's not alone there.

"Tread lightly, she is near."

She encounters haunting remnants of a beautiful young woman who lived and loved there centuries ago. She finds herself transported into 17th-century England, and into the world of Mariana.

Each time Julia travels back, she becomes more enthralled with the past... until she realizes Mariana's life is eclipsing her own. She must lay the past to rest or risk losing the chance for happiness in her own time.

A modern gothic historical fiction with elements of time travel, reincarnation, and romance from New York Times and USA Today bestselling author Susanna Kearsley.


Novel Gobblers Perspective

Carol's Rating:  ★★★★

"You can't cheat fate, Julia. If you don't go looking for the lessons of the past, then the past will come looking for you."

I was surprised by how much I liked this book. Though a bit slow at the start, it gradually builds into a gripping, suspenseful story set in two time periods, current-day and the mid-1700's. Yes, it's time travel, but it's so much more than that.I don't want to spoil the experience for you so I'll just say this: It's two intricately woven stories with intriguing characters and events set in a charming English village. The beautiful language, likable (and some unlikable) characters, surprising twists, and shrewd ending will leave you feeling well rewarded. I'll definitely be reading more books by this author.

Happy Reading!

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Last Days of Summer

Last Days of Summer

Last Days of Summer

Steve Kluger

368 pages
Published May 24th 2005 by Avon (first published 1998)

The hilarious and heart–warming story about a down–and–out kid who finds inspiration in his favourite baseball hero.

In Brooklyn, 1940, a wisecracking, baseball loving twelve–year–old boy, Joey Margolis, is in desperate need of a hero. His rich father has recently divorced his mother, leaving her all but penniless, and she is forced to move herself and her son to an Italian dominated part of Brooklyn, where he's the only Jew in the area. Constant abuse from other boys in the neighbourhood prompts Joey to send letters to Charlie Banks, an up–and–coming star with the New York Giants, asking for a home run so he can tell everyone that it was for him. Joey uses every trick in the book to get what he wants and the friendship that comes out of their simple correspondence will change them both forever.

This improbable friendship is woven together through letters, postcards, notes, telegrams, newspaper clippings, report cards and ticket stubs, and includes a colourful cast of supporting characters.

o The joys and sorrows growing up will always have an audience and this novel sheds light on all the complexity of those difficult times, with humour and joy.


Novel Gobblers Perspective

Carol's Rating:  ★★★★

Even though most of the characters seemed to have the same witty humor -- cheeky and irreverent but usually with good intentions -- I found this to be an amusing, nostalgic, rollicking fun story that had me laughing out and loud and a couple of times it even brought tears to my eyes. I loved the informal, unconventional format. Highly recommended if you're looking for a fast, entertaining read. 

Happy Reading!

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The Ocean at the End of the Lane

The Ocean at the End of the Lane

The Ocean at the End of the Lane

Neil Gaiman

Pages: 178 / Audiobook: 5 hrs 48 min
Published June 18th 2013 by William Morrow Books

Sussex, England. A middle-aged man returns to his childhood home to attend a funeral. Although the house he lived in is long gone, he is drawn to the farm at the end of the road, where, when he was seven, he encountered a most remarkable girl, Lettie Hempstock, and her mother and grandmother. He hasn't thought of Lettie in decades, and yet as he sits by the pond (a pond that she'd claimed was an ocean) behind the ramshackle old farmhouse, the unremembered past comes flooding back. And it is a past too strange, too frightening, too dangerous to have happened to anyone, let alone a small boy.

Forty years earlier, a man committed suicide in a stolen car at this farm at the end of the road. Like a fuse on a firework, his death lit a touchpaper and resonated in unimaginable ways. The darkness was unleashed, something scary and thoroughly incomprehensible to a little boy. And Lettie—magical, comforting, wise beyond her years—promised to protect him, no matter what.

A groundbreaking work from a master, The Ocean at the End of the Lane is told with a rare understanding of all that makes us human, and shows the power of stories to reveal and shelter us from the darkness inside and out. It is a stirring, terrifying, and elegiac fable as delicate as a butterfly's wing and as menacing as a knife in the dark.


Novel Gobblers Perspective

Carol's Rating:  ★★★★

This is a haunting, mysterious, magical story. It's short. It's creative. It packs a punch. The words flow quickly and hold your attention to the end. I enjoyed it so much that I'm hoping the author will create a sequel.

The beautiful, fluid writing is succinct yet clearly conveys the intent of the author to scare the wits out you while at the same time reassuring you with his gentle voice that the powerful, capable women will keep the boy safe, and all will be well. I loved this story and as for the audiobook, Neil Gaiman delivers a fantastic performance!

Happy Reading!

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11/22/63

11/22/63

11/22/63

Stephen King

Pages: 849 / Audio: 30 hrs 44 mins
Published November 8th 2011 by Scribner

Dallas, 11/22/63: Three shots ring out.

President John F. Kennedy is dead.

Life can turn on a dime—or stumble into the extraordinary, as it does for Jake Epping, a high school English teacher in a Maine town. While grading essays by his GED students, Jake reads a gruesome, enthralling piece penned by janitor Harry Dunning: fifty years ago, Harry somehow survived his father’s sledgehammer slaughter of his entire family. Jake is blown away...but an even more bizarre secret comes to light when Jake’s friend Al, owner of the local diner, enlists Jake to take over the mission that has become his obsession—to prevent the Kennedy assassination. How? By stepping through a portal in the diner’s storeroom, and into the era of Ike and Elvis, of big American cars, sock hops, and cigarette smoke... Finding himself in warmhearted Jodie, Texas, Jake begins a new life. But all turns in the road lead to a troubled loner named Lee Harvey Oswald. The course of history is about to be rewritten...and become heart-stoppingly suspenseful.


Novel Gobblers Perspective

Carol's Rating:  ★★★

I was completely engrossed in this story - I could not put it down! And that's saying a lot because it is a big book; 849 pages that flew by! If you're like me and have avoided Stephen King's books because they are typically full of horror, rest assured this is one is not typical. It is a fascinating story about an ordinary guy experiencing extraordinary events and trying to set things "right". It takes you along for his journeys from 2011 to the time of "ago", 1959-1963, and what happens when you try to change the "obdurate past". There were several times I thought I knew where the story would go and each time I was completely surprised by the unexpected twists. It is a fascinating, exciting, and often touching story that captivated my attention and left me completely satisfied. At the end, I especially enjoyed the author's personal notes to the reader, wherein he gives additional details of his research - which began in the 1970's!

About the Author

 

 
 
King Reveals 11/22/63

Stephen King

Source: Amazon.com

Stephen King is the author of more than fifty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes Doctor Sleep and Under the Dome, now a major TV miniseries on CBS. His novel 11/22/63 was named a top ten book of 2011 by The New York Times Book Review and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Mystery/Thriller as well as the Best Hardcover Book Award from the International Thriller Writers Association. He is the recipient of the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.

King was born in Portland, Maine in 1947 and grew up in Durham, Maine. He attended the University of Maine at Orono, where he wrote a weekly column for the school newspaper, The Maine Campus. He was also active in student politics, serving as a member of the Student Senate, and supporting the anti-war movement. King graduated from the University of Maine at Orono in 1970, with a B.A. in English. He married Tabitha Spruce in 1971. King sprang onto the literary scene with the publication of Carrie (Doubleday, 1974) which was later made into a movie. The success of Carrie allowed him to leave his high school teaching position and write full-time. Other bestselling novels followed including The Shining, The Stand and The Dead Zone. Stephen King is known as a prolific writer of horror, suspense, science fiction and fantasy. His books have sold more than 350 million copies worldwide and many of his literature has been adapted to the screen and television. 

A Conversation with Stephen King

Source: 112263book.com

Where were you when JFK was assassinated?

When I got the news I was in a hearse. I was a tuition kid in a little town and there was no bus service to the high school where we went. So our parents clubbed together and paid a guy who had a converted hearse, which he turned into a kind of school bus, and we went back and forth in that.

We didn’t get the news that Kennedy had been assassinated in school. But when we got into the hearse to go home, the driver, Mike, had the radio on for the first time in living memory. We heard that Kennedy had been killed. Mike, who was kind of silent, spoke up. “They’ll catch the son of a bitch who did that and somebody will kill him.” And that’s exactly what happened.

When and why did you decide to write a novel about the Kennedy assassination?

I tried to write this novel in 1973 when I was teaching high school. At that time it was called Split Track and I wrote fourteen single-spaced pages. Then I stopped. The research was daunting for someone who was working full-time at another job. Also, I understood I wasn’t ready— the scope was too big for me at that time. I put the book aside and thought someday maybe I’d go back to it.

I’m glad that I didn’t go forward with it then. In 1973 the wound was still too fresh. Now it’s going on half a century since Kennedy was assassinated. I think that’s about long enough. I recently saw Robert Redford’s film The Conspirator about the Lincoln assassination. That was a hundred fifty years ago, but it’s still kind of a shock to see the president of the United States assassinated by a lone gunman.

How does having a modern character going back in time affect the way you depict the 1950s, as opposed to simply setting a novel then?

Jake Epping, my main character, makes several different trips into the past—every trip takes him back to two minutes before noon on September 19, 1958, and every trip is a complete reset. Little by little he gets used to it, but the contrast between his twenty-first-century sensibility and the world of that late fifties and early sixties is jarring in a way that Mad Men isn’t. And sometimes it’s pretty funny, as when Jake gets caught singing a risqué Rolling Stones tune and tries to convince his girlfriend that he heard a song containing the lyrics “she tried to take me upstairs for a ride” on the radio!

We’re pretty well anchored in the present, the world that we live in as it is now—a world where there’s four-dollar-a-gallon gasoline, where men and women have a certain equality, where there’s an African American president, where we have computers. When you first go back to 1958, the trip is jarring. Yet the longer Jake stays, the more he feels at home in that particular world. Eventually, he doesn’t want to leave it. He’s gotten fond of his life at a time when you didn’t have to take your shoes off at the airport.

The act of writing is almost an act of hypnosis. You can remember things that are not immediately accessible to the conscious mind. I felt extremely challenged as I began this book. Could I really capture the sense of what it was like to live between 1958 and 1963? But writing, like anything imaginative, is an act of faith. You have to believe that those details will be there when you need them.

The more I wrote about those years, the more I remembered. I used research when I fell short but it was amazing how much came back to me—the sound coins made when you dropped them into the machine when you got on the bus; the smell of movie theaters when everybody was smoking; the dances, the teenage slang, books that were current, and the importance of the library in research. There’s a funny sequence where Jake needs to find somebody and is very frustrated; if he had his computer he could simply run a search engine and get what he needed in two or three minutes. There weren’t Jetways then; you walked out of a terminal and mounted the steps to get on a TWA plane. Now, TWA doesn’t exist anymore, but that’s the airline carrier that brought Lee Harvey Oswald back to Texas

 

When researching the music of the day, do you listen to those songs as you write?

I’ve always been a pop music fan. I have a good grasp of music between 1955 and now—it’s just one of the places where my head feels at home. It’s also one of the indicators of how American life changes and what’s going on at any particular time.

One of the epigrams for 11/22/63 is “dancing is life,” and dancing is something that has always interested me. It’s symbolic in so many ways of the courting ritual. The changes in dancing mirror the changes in the way we court and love and live over the years. I went to YouTube to watch videos of dances from the fifties and the sixties and that was an interesting thing, to watch people do the Stroll and the Madison, the Lindy Hop, Hell’s a Poppin’—fantastic stuff. I’m crazy about music and I’m crazy about dancing and some of that’s in the book.

I listen to music all the time. Not when I’m composing fresh copy, but when I’m rewriting or editing, I’ve always got it on and it’s always turned up really loud. I also have certain touchstone songs that I go back to—they drive my wife, my kids, my grandchildren crazy. I’m the sort of guy who will play Whitney Houston’s “I Will Always Love You” twenty-five times until I discover the song was written by Dolly Parton and then I listen to the Dolly Parton version forty times.

The music that made the biggest impression on me was rock ’n’ roll from the early fifties. I tried to get into the book the excitement that the kids felt to hear someone like Jerry Louis, Chuck Berry, or Little Richard. The first time you heard Little Richard your life changed. The first time I heard Freddie Cannon do “Palisades Park” I thought to myself, “This makes me feel so happy to be alive.”

 

Majestic Theatre, Dallas, TX November 10, 2011

King talks about the book, Dallas, the 1960s, the Kennedy assassination, as well as his career and politics. This is a 7 minute clip or you can watch the full interview HERE - it's great! I had no idea King was so witty and funny!

11/22/63 - Now a Hulu Original Series

Watch the official trailer for the Hulu original series 11/22/63 (premiered February 15th, 2016).

Discussion Questions

Questions from 112263Book.com

Downloadable pdf

1. Where were you when JFK was assassinated?
2. 11/22/63 is filled with historical research—it twins real events with events and characters from King’s imagination. Did you learn anything surprising about the actual events leading up to the Kennedy assassination while reading this novel?
3. Our hero Jake Epping goes on an epic journey to try to prevent Kennedy’s assassination. Why choose this watershed moment in American history rather than any other moment? Would you choose a different moment, and if so, when?
4. Many great books, TV shows and movies have investigated the idea of time travel. Do you have any particular favorite books or films that explore this?
5. When Jake lives in 1960s small town Texas, he meets some of the most important people in his life, including the lanky, lovely librarian Sadie. Why is Jake drawn to her? And why is she drawn to him? How does their relationship change over the course of the novel?
6. What is the role of romance in this book? Some reviewers of 11/22/63 cited King’s optimism about love—after reading 11/22/63, do you agree?
7. Jake (or rather George) has to spend a lot of time in Dallas, which he experiences as a malevolent place. Jodie, on the other hand, is everything idyllic small town America should be. Do you believe that certain places are evil at certain times?
8. 11/22/63 gives readers an opportunity to immerse themselves in the past, in all its casual cigarette smoking glory—the music, food, language, cars, and dancing. What are your favorite things about the 50s and 60s King creates in 11/22/63? And least favorite?
9. Do you believe in the butterfly effect/chaos theory?
10. If you could pick any other period in history that you could go back to, which would it be?
11. Conspiracy theories abound, and numerous books have been written on the subject of the Kennedy assassination. In his afterword, King concludes (as Jake does in the book) that Lee Harvey Oswald was the lone gunman, a disturbed and grandiose man who altered world history forever all on his own. Do you agree? 

 

Questions from Litlovers.com

1. How would you describe Jake Epping—what kind of man is he? How does his ex-wife see him? How do others see him. How do you see him?

2. Why does Jake agree to go back in time—what are his reasons? At this stage in your own life, would you be willing to travel back to the past? What conditions would you require to do so?

2. Why does King inject the Derry, Maine, subplot into the main plot? Is the Dunning episode necessary to the story—or does it drag down the novel's pace?

3. Describe the world of 1958 in which 2011 Jake finds himself. What is appealing about the era...and what is unappealing?

4. Once in Texas, what does Jake, now George Amberson, come to learn about Lee Harvey Oswald? What kind of character is Oswald? When Oswald arrives on the scene, why doesn't Jake/George just take him out? Why does he delay?

5. Follow-up to Question 4: What makes Jake/George (and the author) conclude that Oswald acted alone? Do you think he did? Have you done any previous reading/research that suggests Oswald was not a lone gunman? (see LitLovers review of Conspiracy by Anthony Summers.)

6. Jake/George has come to believe that life is not random:

Coincidences happen, but I’ve come to believe they are actually quite rare. Something is at work, O.K.? Somewhere in the universe (or behind it), a great machine is ticking and turning its fabulous gears.

What does Jake/George mean? Do you believe in a "great machine," an over-arching fate, or God who oversees and intervenes in our lives. Do "things happen for a reason"? What are your thoughts?

7. What is the nature of time as presented in 11/22/63? Consider the following:

    • Time doesn't want to be changed: time is "obdurate." Why?
    • Harmonies crop up, similarities in names and events. Why?
    • The butterfly effect—what is it?
    • The Yellow Card Man—is he a sentinel?
    • Time is like a string; changing events tangles the strings.

8.  Follow-up to Question 7: What does the novel, ultimately, seem to suggest about the hiuman desire to alter the past?

9. Follow-up to Questions 7 & 8: How does the novel present the notion of history? Is history shaped by individuals whose actions, discoveries, and intentions alter the course of events? Or is history created by the interconnectedness of a multitude of events, generated by forces bigger than any single individual?

10. King has a talent for taking supernatural events and locating them in everyday, mundane settings. How does he do that in 11/22/63? Does he pull it off...or does he falter?

11. 14. Why does Sadie sense that there's something odd about Jake/George? What are some of the ways that George's knowledge of the future betray him? Why does he withhold the truth from Sadie for so long? How would you react if someone told you he/she came from the future?

12. How would you classify this book? Historical fiction? Science fiction? Alternate history? Romance? Thriller? Realism? Is it suspenseful—did you find yourself rushing to turn the page? Were you expecting George to succeed—or fail—in his mission?

13. SPOILER ALERT: Talk about Jake/George's decision to return to 2011. Why does he make the choice he does? Do you wish he had chosen differently?

14. SPOILER ALERT: Talk about the dystopian world Jake returns to in 2011. What were the series of events that led up to the conditions he finds?

15. If you've read other Stephen King books, or seen the movies, how does this book compare with his others? Has he jumped his usual genre...or expanded it? Does that fact that King's normal genre is fantasy-horror make him especially equipped as an author to write a book like 11/22/63?

 

Happy Reading!

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The Night the Mountain Fell

The Night the Mountain Fell

The Night the Mountain Fell

The Story of the Montana-Yellowstone Earthquake

Edmund Christopherson

Pages: 88
Published 1960
AUGUST IS A BUSY MONTH in the exciting mountain vacation area that centers in West Yellowstone, Montana, and includes Yellowstone National Park, the restored ghost town of Virginia City, the nationally famous trout fishing reach of Madison Canyon that, runs through the Gallatin National Forest, plus dude ranches and lakes in the parts of Montana, Wyoming and Idaho where the three states come together.

Geologically, it’s a new area, where enormous forces are still thrusting up mountains, where volcanic craters still exist, and where the heat of the earth still spouts its imprisoned fury through the geysers that have made Yellowstone Park’s Firehole Basin famous.

At 11:37 P. M. on Monday, August 17, 1959, one of the severest earthquakes recorded on the North American continent shook this area. It sent gigantic tidal waves surging down the 7-mile length of Hebgen Lake, throwing an enormous quantity of water over the top of Hebgen Dam, the way you can slosh water out of a dishpan, still keeping it upright. This water—described as a wall 20 ft. high—swept down the narrow Madison Canyon, full of campers and vacationers who were staying in dude ranches and at three Forest Service campgrounds along the seven-mile stretch from the dam to the point where the canyon opened up into rolling wheat and grazing land. Just about the time this surge of water reached the mouth of the canyon, half of a 7,600-ft.-high mountain came crashing down into the valley and cascaded, like water, up the opposite canyon wall, hurtling house-size quartzite and dolomite boulders onto the lower portion of Rock Creek Campground.

This slide dammed the river and forced the surging water —carrying trees, mud, and debris, back into the campground. The campers who’d escaped being crushed under part of the 44 million cubic yards (80 million tons) of rock found themselves picked up and thrown against trees, cars, trailers, the side of the canyon, etc. Heavy, 4,000 pound cars were tossed 40 ft. and smashed against trees by the force of the ricocheting water and the near-hurricane velocity wind created by the mountainfall. Other cars were scrunched to suitcase thickness and thrown out from under the slide.

And the water stayed—held by the earthquake-caused natural dam. It began to flood the lower end of the canyon. At the upper end, big sections of the road that would take the 300 people trapped in the canyon to safety crumpled and fell into Hebgen Lake, cutting them off from the world outside.


Novel Gobblers Perspective

Carol's Rating:  ★★★

This was an interesting book full of first-hand accounts and geologic facts of the tragic 1959 Montana-Yellowstone earthquake and landslide. With a 7.8 rating on the Richter scale, it was nearly as big as the 8.2 rating of the 1906 San Fransisco quake. Having occurred late into the night, the accounts tell of the death and destruction left in its wake; however, the accounts also tell of the grand heroic acts of communities near and far to provide aid to the victims. 

Happy Reading!

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Catherine’s Progress

Catherine’s Progress

Catherine's Book Nerd Challenge Progress

50 Books ~ 50 Categories ~ by December 17, 2016

IFPL tote

Because I seriously want to win this nerdy green bag! 

 

Extreme Book Nerd Challenge Categories/Reading List

1

A Biography 

 

5

About an event in American History

 9

 Adult Non-Fiction with Pictures

 

13

 A Non-Fiction Book

 
17

 A Book by an Author from Asia

21

 A Book Published This Year

Pharoah

 
25

 A Book By or About an Explorer

LadiesOfCanyon

 

2

Book with a Heroine

 

6

Book with a Blue Cover

 
10

Book of Historical Fiction

 14

A Guilty Pleasure

The Life We Bury Book Cover
18

A Science Fiction Book

Martian

22

A Book with a Mode of Transportation in the Title

BOOK Book Reviews 11514819042

 
26

A Book Written by Someone From Idaho

SunAlsoRises

 
 
3

Book with an Animal in the Title

Goldfinch

 

7

Book About a Sport

 

11

A Book You Love- Read it Again

15

A Book Club in a Box Book

 

19

A Book Set in Summer

Machupicchu

 
23

A Classic Children's Story

tollbooth

 
27

A Book on How To Do Something

Panorama

4

A Book about your Hobby

 

 

  

8

Book About Best Friends

 12

Book with a Lion, Witch or Wardrobe

16

Book Set During a War

 
20

A Book Set in This Region

Repose

24

Listen to an Audiobook

ThePrince

 

 27 books was as far as Catherine was able to go on the 2016 challenge 
Because She Did THIS Instead!

 

 

The Book Thief

The Book Thief

The Book Thief

Markus Zusak

Pages: 592 / audiobook: 13 hrs 56 min

The extraordinary #1 New York Times bestseller that is now a major motion picture, Markus Zusak's unforgettable story is about the ability of books to feed the soul.

It is 1939. Nazi Germany. The country is holding its breath. Death has never been busier, and will become busier still.

Liesel Meminger is a foster girl living outside of Munich, who scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she encounters something she can’t resist–books. With the help of her accordion-playing foster father, she learns to read and shares her stolen books with her neighbors during bombing raids as well as with the Jewish man hidden in her basement.

In superbly crafted writing that burns with intensity, award-winning author Markus Zusak, author of I Am the Messenger, has given us one of the most enduring stories of our time.


Novel Gobblers Perspective

Carol's Rating:  ★★★★

I have avoided this book for a long time, mainly because of all the hype. After some encouragement from a friend, I finally decided to give it a try and I am so glad I did! I get it now. I get all the hype.

I listened to the audiobook narrated by Allan Corduner who delivers a fantastic performance. With a pleasing voice, tempo, and German accent, the characters were brought to life.

Beautifully written with a refreshing twist on the telling of a story set during WWII, the story is told by Death who is surprisingly empathetic yet of course, being very busy during wartime, he has a job to do. He tells about Liesel, her mother and brother, her stern foster mother, her gentle, accordian playing foster father, her adventurous friends, how they feel about the Fuhrer, and Liesel's penchant for books.

The characters have depth and interest, the story is engaging, touching, and filled with lyrical phrases. Highly recommended.

Happy Reading!

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