Books of the Month – April 2017

Books of the Month – April 2017

Books of the Month - April 2017

Books of the Month - April 2017

Books of the Month - April 2017
Here it is June already and I'm only now posting about the books for April. How did that happen??? My usual routine has been turned completely upside down and while I did not read as much as I intended, I did have the good fortune to attend some great author events that I'm super excited to tell you about! Take a look below - have you read any books by these authors or attended live events? Leave a comment at the bottom of the page and tell us about it!

Note: Some of the books I read are featured in our The Book & Beyond section.  That's where you'll find interesting things about and even beyond the book. I'd love to feature every book I read in The Book & Beyond section but it' usually a matter of time and a matter of which books and topics really stir my curiosity.  🙂

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I have wanted to see Garrison Keillor (The Prairie Home Companion, The News from Lake Wobegon, and more) in a live performance for as long as I can remember and was completely bummed when he retired from Prairie Home Companion. Then to my surprise, I discovered he often goes on tour and that he would be performing at a nearby university this year!  I was stoked! I immediately bought tickets and began counting down the days.

Finally the moment arrived. He walked out onto stage in his trademark off-white linen suit with bright a red tie and red high-top sneakers. For nearly 3 hours he completely captivated us with songs, poems, and stories that had us rolling with laughter.  To top it all off, after the performance I had the opportunity to meet him and shake his hand!

This was truly an opportunity of a lifetime for me. I so admire him and have enjoyed his talents for years. I am saddened to think that when he fully retires, it will be the end of a fantastic era; he may very well be the last performer of his kind. I am so thankful I was able to see his performance and meet him. If you have the chance, grab it while you can! You won't be disappointed.

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Stormy CoveStormy Cove by Bernadette Calonego
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I purchased this book after becoming Instagram friends with the author and I so enjoyed it! It reads fast and the story progresses at a nice pace. Bernadette Colonego writes beautifully and her descriptions of the landscape, the town, and the townspeople made me feel like I was actually there. I loved the small town setting where everyone knows each other, no one locks their doors, their lifestyles mirror the harshness and beauty of their environment, they gossip about each other and yet for the most part, support and love each other, too. I enjoyed the bit of romance along with the suspense and mystery of the story where you could never be sure who the bad guy was. I did have trouble keeping the many characters straight even with the help of character list provided at the front of the book. But all in all, it was engaging and unpredictable and would make for a great beach read.

Are you on Instagram? If so, you should definitely start following Bernadette Calonego. She consistently posts the most beautiful photographs of her globe-trotting adventures and research for her books. It's so fun to see the world through her photos.

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Our book club enjoyed reading All the Light You Cannot See in 2015 so having the opportunity to attend Anthony Doerr's live presentation this month was one more opportunity of a lifetime (that's two in one month but who's counting? ME! I'm counting!). Anthony Doerr is a masterful storyteller with an intellectual depth and breadth in science. Combine that with his humor and wit and he can expertly convey his messages in a manner that you'll not only completely understand but that you'll take with you to ponder on long afterwards. He is truly another author that if you have the opportunity to see in person, don't miss him! In the meantime, click here to take a look at all the cool stuff we learned from his book and presentation.

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 Lab Girl  by Hope Jahren

Lab Girl was our club selection for April and I'm telling you, Hope Jahren writes beautifully.  Her story is touching and warm. Our club meeting was fantastic and the our members seemed to really enjoy it. Donna, our hosting member for the month, prepared a fabulous meal with potato dumplings as described in the book along with some delicious salads and Hungarian Stew. So delicious!

 

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Hungry for more? Check out  The Book and Beyond,  The Books We've Read, or See all my reviews on Goodreads .

Happy Reading!

Cucumber Tomato Salad

Cucumber Tomato Salad
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
6 people 15 min
Servings Prep Time
6 people 15 min
Cucumber Tomato Salad
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
6 people 15 min
Servings Prep Time
6 people 15 min
Ingredients
Salad
Dressing
Servings: people
Instructions
  1. Place salad ingredients in large bowl and toss.
  2. Mix dressing ingredients in small bowl; stir to combine well & drizzle over salad.
Recipe Notes

Recipe courtesy of Donna via theblondcook.com

Lab Girl by Hope Jahren

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Hungarian Goulash

Hungarian Goulash
Hungarian Goulash
Print Recipe
Hungarian Goulash
Hungarian Goulash
Print Recipe
Ingredients
Servings:
Instructions
  1. In a Dutch oven or large heavy pot, sauté onion in olive oil until translucent. Add garlic, 1/4 tsp. paprika and beef cubes. (For extra flavor, toss beef cubes in 2 tbsp. flour evenly before browning).
  2. Stir well. Add bay leaf. Cover and simmer over very low heat for 1 hour.
  3. Add 1 tsp. paprika and garlic powder. Cover and simmer for another hour or until beef is tender.
  4. 30 minutes before the goulash is ready, stir in caraway seeds and remove the bay leaf. At the same time, add a little more water or beef broth if needed.
Recipe Notes

Variations: May be served over wide egg noodles or boiled potatoes (potatoes cubes can also be added during the last 45 minutes of cooking). Sometimes we stir in sour cream just before serving.

Submitted by: Belle

Recipe courtesy of Donna via Cooks.com

Lab Girl by Hope Jahren

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Potato Dumplings

“I have also never eaten anything that tasted as good  as those dumplings, in all my years since.”

Potato Dumplings as described by Hope Jahren in Lab Girl.

Potato Dumplings
Potato Dumplings
Print Recipe
This recipe does not make fluffy dumplings as in what you might be accustomed to for chicken and dumplings. They are a "sturdy" potato dumpling served as a side dish to be accompanied by meat, and usually also served with a sweet sauerkraut with caraway and honey dish as the vegetable.
Potato Dumplings
Potato Dumplings
Print Recipe
This recipe does not make fluffy dumplings as in what you might be accustomed to for chicken and dumplings. They are a "sturdy" potato dumpling served as a side dish to be accompanied by meat, and usually also served with a sweet sauerkraut with caraway and honey dish as the vegetable.
Ingredients
Servings:
Instructions
  1. Boil peeled potatoes in a small quantity of water. Drain potatoes thoroughly. Rice potatoes using a potato ricer or a regular potato masher (do not use a food processor or the potatoes will be pasty). Allow potatoes to cool.
  2. On a floured work surface, gradually add flour, working mixture into a dough using your hands.
  3. Shape the potato mixture into a long roll and cut into 10 slices. Drop dumplings into boiling water and boil gently for about 5 minutes or until the dumplings rise to the surface. Remove using a perforated spoon to drain on paper towels.
  4. The dumplings are fully cooked after the boiling process, but traditionally, Czechoslovakians then melt butter in a heavy frying pan, and fry the dumplings until they are lightly browned on all sides.
Recipe Notes

Recipe courtesy of Donna via  Cooks.com

Lab Girl by Hope Jahren

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Lab Girl by Hope Jahren

Lab Girl by Hope Jahren

Book Cover for Lab Girl by Hope JahrenLab Girl

Hope Jahren

Club Selection for April 2017

Pages: 290 / Audio: 11 Hrs 45 mins
Published April 5th 2016 by Knopf (first published March 1st 2016)
 
Acclaimed scientist Hope Jahren has built three laboratories in which she’s studied trees, flowers, seeds, and soil. Her first book is a revelatory treatise on plant life—but it is also so much more.
Lab Girl is a book about work, love, and the mountains that can be moved when those two things come together. It is told through Jahren’s stories: about her childhood in rural Minnesota with an uncompromising mother and a father who encouraged hours of play in his classroom’s labs; about how she found a sanctuary in science, and learned to perform lab work done “with both the heart and the hands”; and about the inevitable disappointments, but also the triumphs and exhilarating discoveries, of scientific work.

Yet at the core of this book is the story of a relationship Jahren forged with a brilliant, wounded man named Bill, who becomes her lab partner and best friend. Their sometimes rogue adventures in science take them from the Midwest across the United States and back again, over the Atlantic to the ever-light skies of the North Pole and to tropical Hawaii, where she and her lab currently make their home.

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About the Author

 

Goodreads Author Hope Jahren

HOPE JAHREN

Hope Jahren is an award-winning scientist who has been pursuing independent research in paleobiology since 1996, when she completed her PhD at UC Berkeley and began teaching and researching first at the Georgia Institute of Technology and then at Johns Hopkins University. She is the recipient of three Fulbright Awards and is one of four scientists, and the only woman, to have been awarded both of the Young Investigator Medals given in the Earth Sciences. Currently, she is a tenured professor at the University of Hawaii at Manoa where in 2008 she built the Isotope Geobiology Laboratories, with support from the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the National Institutes of Health.

Interviews & Other Cool Stuff

 

 

 
PBS NEWSHOUR
The secret life of plants — and ‘Lab Girl’ author Hope Jahren
May 24, 2016 at 6:20 PM EDT

 

'Lab Girl': An Homage To The Wonders Of All Things Green
April 22, 20165:10 AM ET
Heard on Morning Edition

Listen below or get the transcript here

Book Club Mojo

Donna hosted the meeting for Lab Girl and pulled together a beautiful evening full of great discussion and delicious food themed after the book; Potato Dumplings (a true labor of love) and Hungarian Goulash. She also prepared a fresh Cucumber Tomato Salad and served Pickled Beet Salad from Trader Joes. We were all so busy talking and enjoying the meal that we forgot to take photos of the evening so you'll want to look over Donna's recipes and give them a try to experience Lab Girl more fully!

Discussion Questions

Source: Litlovers

1. How did Jahren's upbringing help determine her dedication to science? Consider her father's background as a science teacher and her mother's love of English literature.

2. One of the literary tropes Jahren uses in her memoir is the comparison of plant life with human life. Talk about the parallels she draws between her subjects and herself. In what ways are we all similar to our rooted, blossoming brethren? Do you see those parallels in your own life?

3. What do you find most remarkable in Jahren's descriptions of the wonders of the natural world? Consider, for instance, the sheer numbers of the plant world. Or how the willow tree clones itself...or the symbiotic relationship between trees and fungi...or the airborne signals of trees in their perennial war against insects.

4. Talk about Jahren's struggle with manic depression and how it has affected her life and work.

5. How would you describe Jahren's relationship with her lab partner Bill? What makes both professional and personal relationship work?

6. Describe some of the hardships that make life for any scientist difficult—bucking the status quo, the often endless waiting for results, the grunt work, or the scarcity of funding.

7. Will you ever take a tree—or any plant life—for granted again?

 

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Source: Penguin Random House

1. Lab Girl opens with a detailed description of the laboratory Jahren loved as a child. How does she transform a cinder-block room stocked with scientific equipment into a “castle” (p. 8)?  In what ways do her recollections of her time in the lab and the trips home late at night with her father evoke the mood and magic of fairy tales? 

2. Jahren writes of the emotional distances between members of a Scandinavian family, of “growing up in a culture where you can never ask anyone anything about themselves” (p.11). Are Jahren’s feelings about her family shaped solely by cultural tradition? 

3. Does Jahren’s observation that “being mother and daughter has always felt like an experiment that we just can’t get right” (p. 16) capture something you have experienced, either as a parent or child? Why do you think Jahren dedicated Lab Girl to her mother? 

4. Jahren writes, “I chose science because science gave me what I needed—a home as defined in the most literal sense: a safe place to be” (p. 18).  Discuss and evaluate the combination of elements that determine her choice, including her attachment to her father and the recognition that “being a scientist wasn’t his job, it was his identity,” the acceptance by her science professors of “the very attributes that rendered me a nuisance to all of my previous teachers,” and her simple declaration that the desire to become a scientist “was founded upon a deep instinct and nothing more.”  Compare this initial explanation with the self-portrait she offers in the final chapter (p. 277).
 [eallen1]Per text of book. 

5. In alternating chapters, Jahren forges links between her own life and the plants that have populated it. How does the story of the blue spruce tree (pp. 27–29) set a pattern that is echoed and enhanced throughout the book? What insights do these close examinations of a large variety of plants provide into the needs and the capabilities shared by all living things? Is there a particular topic—for instance, the universal struggle for survival or the interdependence evident in nature—that resonates with you?

6. In recalling her first scientific breakthrough, Jahren writes, “On some deep level, the realization that I could do good science was accompanied by the knowledge that I had formally and terminally missed my chance to become like any of the women that I had ever known” (p. 71).  What are the emotional and practical repercussions of this moment?  Is there a moment in most people’s lives that marks a line between who they are and who they might have been?

7. Jahren describes her struggles with mental illness in a gripping and vivid interlude (pp. 144–47).  Why do you think she introduces this at the midpoint of her book?

8. Jahren’s relationship with Bill is a sustained theme in Lab Girl.  In what ways do Bill’s manner and methods in the lab complement Jahren’s?  What qualities shape their behavior toward each other on a personal level? Discuss the sense of intimacy and tolerance at the core of their friendship, as well as the boundaries they establish.  What do their long conversations, their reactions to institutional rules, and the misadventures they share on their field trips all add to the book?  In what ways does their trip to the Arctic capture the essence of their bond (pp. 195–201)?

9. What previously hidden aspects of Jahren’s character come to light as she describes her meeting and marriage to Clint (pp. 205–209)?  

10. Jahren writes of her pregnancy, “I know that I am supposed to be happy and excited. . . . I am supposed to celebrate the ripening fruit of love and luxuriate in the fullness of my womb. But I don’t do any of this” (p. 217).  How do such factors as her childhood, her professional ambitions, and her mental illness affect her experience? Why does she “decide that I will not be this child’s mother. Instead, I will be his father” (p. 228). 

11. What obstacles does Jahren face in her career as a research scientist?  Are some of the setbacks Jahren faces attributable to her being a woman in a male-dominated field? 

12. Do you agree that “America may say that it values science, but it sure as hell doesn’t want to pay for it” (p. 123)?

13. Science writing is sometimes criticized for seeming to anthropomorphize scientific subjects. Do you think that Jahren avoids this potential pitfall? In what ways do her choice of words and use of metaphor balance the scientific facts that she wants to convey with having the reader understand and even delight in these facts? What facts did you find most interesting?

14. As you read Lab Girl, were you equally engaged with the autobiographical sections and the chapters on plants and trees, or did you find yourself more drawn to one or the other? 

15. Lab Girl makes use of a wide range of language and tones, from the scientific to the colloquial, from biblical references to profanity. Does this range subvert our expectations about how scientists “should” talk? What do the different tones reveal about Hope? How does her varied language help us to see her in multiple lights—as scientist and writer, as friend and human?

16. Memoir is a highly intimate form. Do you feel you’ve gotten to know Hope through Lab Girl? Does she seem similar or different to science teachers you have had? Do you see her as an inspiration for young women who want to pursue a career in science?

 

 

Happy Reading!

All The Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

All The Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

All The Light We Cannot See

 Anthony Doerr  

Club Selection for March 2015

530 pages
Published May 6th 2014 by Scribner
 
Winner of the 2015 Pulitzer Prize For Fiction
From the highly acclaimed, multiple award-winning Anthony Doerr, the beautiful, stunningly ambitious instant New York Times bestseller about a blind French girl and a German boy whose paths collide in occupied France as both try to survive the devastation of World War II.

Marie-Laure lives with her father in Paris near the Museum of Natural History, where he works as the master of its thousands of locks. When she is six, Marie-Laure goes blind and her father builds a perfect miniature of their neighborhood so she can memorize it by touch and navigate her way home. When she is twelve, the Nazis occupy Paris and father and daughter flee to the walled citadel of Saint-Malo, where Marie-Laure’s reclusive great-uncle lives in a tall house by the sea. With them they carry what might be the museum’s most valuable and dangerous jewel.

In a mining town in Germany, the orphan Werner grows up with his younger sister, enchanted by a crude radio they find. Werner becomes an expert at building and fixing these crucial new instruments, a talent that wins him a place at a brutal academy for Hitler Youth, then a special assignment to track the resistance. More and more aware of the human cost of his intelligence, Werner travels through the heart of the war and, finally, into Saint-Malo, where his story and Marie-Laure’s converge.

 

About the Author

Photo from Tweeds Mag http://tweedsmag.org/interview-anthony-doerr/
Anthony Doerr

Anthony Doerr was born and raised in Cleveland, Ohio. He is the author of the story collections The Shell Collector and Memory Wall, the memoir Four Seasons in Rome, and the novels About Grace and All the Light We Cannot See, which was awarded the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for fiction and the 2015 Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction.

Doerr’s fiction has won four O. Henry Prizes and has been anthologized in The Best American Short StoriesThe Anchor Book of New American Short Stories, and The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Fiction. He has won the Barnes & Noble Discover Prize, the Rome Prize, the New York Public Library’s Young Lions Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, an NEA Fellowship, the National Magazine Award for Fiction, three Pushcart Prizes, two Pacific Northwest Book Awards, three Ohioana Book Awards, the 2010 Story Prize, which is considered the most prestigious prize in the U.S. for a collection of short stories, and the Sunday Times EFGShort Story Award, which is the largest prize in the world for a single short story. In 2007, the British literary magazine Granta placed Doerr on its list of 21 Best Young American novelists.

Doerr lives in Boise, Idaho with his wife and two sons. Though he is often asked, as far as he knows he is not related to the late writer Harriet Doerr.

Source: anthonydoerr.com

Interviews & Other Cool Stuff

 

Official Book Trailer

 

 

What Does the Title Mean?

 “It’s a reference first and foremost to all the light we literally cannot see: that is, the wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum that are beyond the ability of human eyes to detect (radio waves, of course, being the most relevant). It’s also a metaphorical suggestion that there are countless invisible stories still buried within World War II — that stories of ordinary children, for example, are a kind of light we do not typically see. Ultimately, the title is intended as a suggestion that we spend too much time focused on only a small slice of the spectrum of possibility.”    ~ Anthony Doerr

 

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Anthony Doerr sees the world as a scientist, but feels it as a poet. He knows about everything—radios, diamonds, mollusks, birds, flowers, locks, guns—but he also writes a line so beautiful, creates an image or scene so haunting, it makes you think forever differently about the big things—love, fear, cruelty, kindness, the countless facets of the human heart. Wildly suspenseful, structurally daring, rich in detail and soul, Doerr’s new novel is that novel, the one you savor, and ponder, and happily lose sleep over, then go around urging all your friends to read—now.

~ JR Moehringer, author of The Tender Bar

 

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THE RUMPUS INTERVIEW WITH ANTHONY DOERR

BY NANCY SMITH | May 28th, 2014

… I first encountered Doerr’s work a decade ago when I picked up a copy of The Shell Collector at a small bookstore in Seattle. I carried the book to a nearby coffee shop and spent the rainy afternoon reading it. I had recently graduated college, and I’m not sure if it was my uncertain future or the gloomy day, but this collection of stories had a profound effect on me. I found a precise kind of truth within those pages—the kind that captures human experience in only the way perfectly crafted stories can. I reveled in those wonderful sentences that afternoon, and since then I have always looked forward to reading Doerr’s work.

… All the Light We Cannot See is a book that was ten years in the making, and it is a remarkable novel, but perhaps more than anything, it has reminded me of Doerr’s extraordinary ability to bring together the elements—rhythm and imagery and tone—to somehow perfectly capture the most mysterious parts of our experience—love and fear and fate—with something so simple as a sentence. … [Read the Interview]

 

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An Evening with Anthony Doerr

Novel Gobblers Dawn, Carol, DeeAnn, Donna, & Catherine
On April 20th, 2017, our reading group had the opportunity to attend "An Evening with Anthony Doerr", a lecture and dinner for the Idaho Humanities Council's 10th Annual event. For some, this may sound like a torturous evening but I'm here to tell you it was anything but torturous and boring! 
 
Anthony Doerr was gracious, insightful, witty, inspiring, and full of captivating stories that had the audience rolling with laughter. It was such a fun evening! Now we're all eager to gobble down more novels written by Anthony Doerr! 
 
I was especially pleased that his presentation was very similar to that in the video below, which you won't want to miss. Click the play button, sit back and enjoy Anthony Doerr's wit and  enthusiasm for discovery. You'll be glad you did!
  

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A captivating presentation by Anthony Doerr to the John Adams Institute, Amsterdam.  
A Masterpiece. Tremendous. Wow. Overwhelming.

“Just a few characterizations by readers of Anthony Doerr’s All the Light We Cannot See. And the literary critics were also unanimous: Anthony Doerr has an immense talent for storytelling.”

 

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An Unforgettable Highlight for the Author

“Among multiple outstanding experiences at Lake Oswego Reads [Feb 12, 2015] (hosted by the amazing Lake Oswego Public Library), an unforgettable highlight was being handed a warm loaf of bread by master baker Dominique Geulin from St. Honoré Boulangerie. I carried it back home, sliced it, and look what we found inside!”

Discussion Questions

Source: Simon and Schuster

1. The book opens with two epigraphs. How do these quotes set the scene for the rest of the book? Discuss how the radio plays a major part in the story and the time period. How do you think the impact of the radio back then compares with the impact of the Internet on today’s society?

2. The narration moves back and forth both in time and between different characters. How did this affect your reading experience? How do you think the experience would have been different if the story had been told entirely in chronological order?

3. Whose story did you enjoy the most? Was there any character you wanted more insight into?

4. When Werner and Jutta first hear the Frenchman on the radio, he concludes his broadcast by saying “Open your eyes and see what you can with them before they close forever” (pages 48–49), and Werner recalls these words throughout the book (pages 86, 264, and 409). How do you think this phrase relates to the overall message of the story? How does it relate to Madame Manec’s question: “Don’t you want to be alive before you die?” (page 270)?

5. On page 160, Marie-Laure realizes “This . . . is the basis of his fear, all fear. That a light you are powerless to stop will turn on you and usher a bullet to its mark.” How does this image constitute the most general basis of all fear? Do you agree?

6. Reread Madame Manec’s boiling frog analogy on page 284. Etienne later asks Marie-Laure, “Who was supposed to be the frog? Her? Or the Germans?” (page 328) Who did you think Madame Manec meant? Could it have been someone other than herself or the Germans? What does it say about Etienne that he doesn’t consider himself to be the frog?

7. On page 368, Werner thinks, “That is how things are . . . with everybody in this unit, in this army, in this world, they do as they’re told, they get scared, they move about with only themselves in mind. Name me someone who does not.” But in fact many of the characters show great courage and selflessness throughout the story in some way, big or small. Talk about the different ways they put themselves at risk in order to do what they think is right. What do you think were some shining moments? Who did you admire most?

8. On page 390, the author writes, “To shut your eyes is to guess nothing of blindness.” What did you learn or realize about blindness through Marie-Laure’s perspective? Do you think her being blind gave her any advantages?

9. One of Werner’s bravest moments is when he confronts von Rumpel: “All your life you wait, and then it finally comes, and are you ready?” (page 465) Have you ever had a moment like that? Were you ready? What would you say that moment is for some of the other characters?

10. Why do you think Marie-Laure gave Werner the little iron key? Why might Werner have gone back for the wooden house but left the Sea of Flames?

11. Von Rumpel seemed to believe in the power of the Sea of Flames, but was it truly a supernatural object or was it merely a gemstone at the center of coincidence? Do you think it brought any protection to Marie-Laure and/or bad luck to those she loved?

Happy Reading!

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The Life We Bury by Allen Eskens

The Life We Bury by Allen Eskens

Club Selection for April 2016

The Life We Bury

Allen Eskens

Pages: 303 / Audio: 8 hrs 24 min

College student Joe Talbert has the modest goal of completing a writing assignment for an English class. His task is to interview a stranger and write a brief biography of the person. With deadlines looming, Joe heads to a nearby nursing home to find a willing subject. There he meets Carl Iverson, and soon nothing in Joe's life is ever the same.

Carl is a dying Vietnam veteran--and a convicted murderer. With only a few months to live, he has been medically paroled to a nursing home, after spending thirty years in prison for the crimes of rape and murder.

As Joe writes about Carl's life, especially Carl's valor in Vietnam, he cannot reconcile the heroism of the soldier with the despicable acts of the convict. Joe, along with his skeptical female neighbor, throws himself into uncovering the truth, but he is hamstrung in his efforts by having to deal with his dangerously dysfunctional mother, the guilt of leaving his autistic brother vulnerable, and a haunting childhood memory.

Thread by thread, Joe unravels the tapestry of Carl’s conviction. But as he and Lila dig deeper into the circumstances of the crime, the stakes grow higher. Will Joe discover the truth before it’s too late to escape the fallout?


Novel Gobblers Perspective

This book took me by surprise. I had a general idea of what the story was about and who the author was yet having no preconceived expectations for the book, I came out very impressed! The story is told from Joe's point of view and I admired this character for his perseverance to improve his life while still helping as best he can with his autistic brother and dysfunctional mother. What could be a simple college English assignment ends up changing Joe's life forever. The book reads at a good pace and while I felt some parts were predictable, the suspense and mystery held my attention enough that I was always eager to get back to reading it. There are many beautifully written descriptions and as Allen Eskens is a fairly new author, I look forward to following him and seeing his skills develop even more. The last paragraph of the book is beautiful and powerful and left me with the strong reminder that we all touch each other lives in different ways, some more profound than others, and it our decision whether or not we allow those experiences to become part of us.

About the Author

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Happy Reading!

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