The Art of Racing in the Rain

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The Art of Racing in the Rain

Garth Stein

Pages: 321 / Audio book: 6 hrs 56 min
Published May 13th 2008 by Harper Collins (first published June 1st 2006)

Enzo knows he is different from other dogs: a philosopher with a nearly human soul (and an obsession with opposable thumbs), he has educated himself by watching television extensively, and by listening very closely to the words of his master, Denny Swift, an up-and-coming race car driver.
Through Denny, Enzo has gained tremendous insight into the human condition, and he sees that life, like racing, isn't simply about going fast. Using the techniques needed on the race track, one can successfully navigate all of life's ordeals.

On the eve of his death, Enzo takes stock of his life, recalling all that he and his family have been through: the sacrifices Denny has made to succeed professionally; the unexpected loss of Eve, Denny's wife; the three-year battle over their daughter, Zoe, whose maternal grandparents pulled every string to gain custody. In the end, despite what he sees as his own limitations, Enzo comes through heroically to preserve the Swift family, holding in his heart the dream that Denny will become a racing champion with Zoe at his side. Having learned what it takes to be a compassionate and successful person, the wise canine can barely wait until his next lifetime, when he is sure he will return as a man.

A heart-wrenching but deeply funny and ultimately uplifting story of family, love, loyalty, and hope, The Art of Racing in the Rain is a beautifully crafted and captivating look at the wonders and absurdities of human life...as only a dog could tell it.


Novel Gobblers Perspective

Carol's Rating:  ★★★★★

This is an unputdownable story that will touch your heart and your funny bone.  It somewhat reminded me of Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom in that it is full of love, compassion, wit, wisdom, and inspiration.  Read it, you'll be glad you did.

 

About the Author

Source: Wikipedia

garth_stein_1111_1-199x300Garth Stein was born in Los Angeles on December 6, 1964, but spent most of his childhood growing up in Seattle. His father, a Brooklyn native, was the child of Austrian Jewish immigrants, while Stein's Alaskan mother comes from Tlingit and Irish descent. Stein later revisited his Tlingit heritage in his first novel, Raven Stole the Moon.

Stein earned a B.A. from Columbia College of Columbia University (1987) and a Master of Fine Arts degree in film from the University's School of the Arts (1990).

Stein has worked as a director, producer and/or writer of documentary films, several of which won awards. In 1991, he co-produced an Academy Award winning short film,The Lunch Date. He then co-produced The Last Party, a film commentating on the 1992 Democratic National Convention. Stein also produced and directed a documentary about his sister's brain surgery, entitled When Your Head's Not a Head, It's a Nut.

After films, Stein took up creative writing. At one time, he taught creative writing at Tacoma School of the Arts. His published works include three books and two plays.Brother Jones, his first play, was produced in Los Angeles, California in 2005. Garth wrote another play (No One Calls Me Mutt Anymore, 2010) for the theatrical department at his alma mater, Shorewood High School in Shoreline, WA.

Stein was born in Los Angeles, grew up in Seattle, and after spending 18 years in New York City, returned to Seattle where he lives with his wife, Andrea Perlbinder Stein, sons Caleb, Eamon and Dashiell — and the family dog, Comet, a lab/poodle mix. When living in New York, played in a rock band, called Zero Band, that rehearsed but rarely performed.

Interviews, Quotes & More

Garth Stein discusses his novel The Art of Racing in the Rain, a heart-wrenching but deeply funny and ultimately uplifting story of family, love, loyalty, and hope, The Art of Racing in the Rain is a beautifully crafted and captivating look at the wonders and absurdities of human life . . . as only a dog could tell it.

 

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Favorite Enzo Quotes

zebra

"...that which we manifest is before us; we are the creators of our own destiny. Be it through intention or ignorance, our successes and our failure have been brought on by none other than ourselves."

"Racing is about discipline and intelligence, not about who has the heavier foot. The one who drives smart will always win in the end."

 

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Banned Seattle author defends ‘Art of Racing in the Rain’

BY JOSH KERNS, KIRO Radio Reporter | September 26, 2014 @ 1:37 pm

garth_comet_2
Seattle author Garth Stein defends his book "The Art of Racing in the Rain" after it was banned by a Texas high school in an interview with KIRO Radio's Jason Rantz. (Photo courtesy Garth Stein)

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Seattle author Garth Stein has a new distinction to add to his resume: his best selling book “The Art of Racing in the Rain” has been banned by a Texas high school.

Stein’s acclaimed novel tells the story of an aspiring Seattle race car driver and mechanic struggling with the death of his wife through the eyes of his dog Enzo, who’s convinced he’ll be reincarnated as a human.

“It’s about perseverance, it’s about self reliance and it’s really about how to lead a good life,” Stein tells KIRO Radio’s Jason Rantz.

But some parents at Dallas’ Highland Park High School objected to some sexual themes and subject matter. In one section, the driver is falsely accused of sexual molestation by an underage girl who tries to force herself on him.

After a heated school board meeting, the school board ordered the 10th grade English class to stop reading the book, along with six other books considered objectionable, The Dallas Morning News reports.

Stein defends the book, and teaching it to 10th graders, saying even the controversial subject matter was “taken quite seriously and with gravitas.”

“Things do happen in this world that are inappropriate and people get themselves into situations where mistakes are made and things are compromised,” he says.

“I think in 10th grade, it’s time to be able to have these discussions about adult subject matter and I think it’s important to do so in a responsible and thoughtful way.”

Stein says he respects the rights of parents to raise concerns about potentially objectionable content. But he’s concerned the parents in Texas didn’t actually read the whole book.

“I think that somebody pulled out a passage and said look at this and then they passed it around and a bunch of people signed their names to it,” he says.

Stein says he believes in the value of a teacher guiding discussions of challenging or controversial subject matter, but says parents should be involved as well.

“I think the objective is to raise the awareness by having a discussion about these things rather than by suppressing the discussion.”

Stein’s book will be reviewed by a committee of parents, teachers and students. The superintendent of schools there says the process could take several months.

Stein questions the way the situation was handled, although he believes both the parents and teachers involved have the best interests of students in mind.

“They should be teaching their students to raise those objections themselves,” he says of potential concerns. “Maybe what’s going on now will lead to schools evaluating how they choose their curriculum, how the community participates in the choosing of that curriculum.”

He’s hopeful that doesn’t include banning books.

Discussion Questions

Everyone in our reading group enjoyed this book and the lively discussion. Donna hosted our meeting and prepared a wonderful meal that included Squash Soup and Apple Dumplings.  To top it off, she cleverly printed our discussion questions on dogbone-shaped slips of paper. Woof!

 

Source: Once a Month Book Club

Many online sources — Reading Group Guides, Harper Collins, the books publisher, and others — have shamelessly plagiarized one another’s reading guide questions. Here they are, in all their commonality :Some early readers of the novel have observed that viewing the world through a dog’s eyes makes for a greater appreciation of being human. Why do you think this is?

  1. Enzo’s observations throughout the novel provide insight into his world view. For example:
    • “The visible becomes inevitable.”
    • “Understanding the truth is simple. Allowing oneself to experience it, is often terrifically difficult.”
    • “No race has ever been won in the first corner; many races have been lost there.”
    • How does his philosophy apply to real life?
  2. In the book’s darkest moments, one of Zoe’s stuffed animals — the zebra — comes to life and threatens him. What does the zebra symbolize?
  3. Can you imagine the novel being told from Denny’s point of view? How would it make the story different?
  4. In the first chapter, Enzo says: “It’s what’s inside that’s important. The soul. And my soul is very human.” How does Enzo’s situation — a human soul trapped in a dog’s body — influence his opinions about what he sees around him? How do you feel about the ideas of reincarnation and karma as Enzo defines them?
  5. Do you find yourself looking at your own dog differently after reading this novel?
  6. In the book, we get glimpses into the mindset and mentality of a race car driver. What parallels can you think of between the art of racing and the art of living?
  7. The character of Ayrton Senna, as he is presented in the book, is heroic, almost a mythic figure. Why do you think this character resonates so strongly for Denny?

OTHER DISCUSSION GUIDE QUESTIONS

A deeper plunge of the Internet provides more unique discussion guide questions. The blog Read to Enrich offers these for discussion:

  1. What was your favorite scene in the novel?
  2. Did you like the technique of making Enzo be the narrator?  Would the story have worked if the narrator was one of the humans?
  3. Do you think dogs or other animals can really understand humans and have the desire to communicate with them?
  4. Discuss Enzo’s more human characteristics:
    • His feelings after Eve died (and his animal reaction of chasing and eating the squirrel ) [page 165]
    • Advising people to learn to listen (page 102)
  5. Can dogs and other animals sense things that humans cannot?  Enzo smelled Eve’s cancer well before anyone made a diagnosis.
  6. What did you think of Enzo’s description of communication, “…there are so many moving parts.  There’s presentation and there’s interpretation and they’re so dependent on each other it makes things very difficult.”  (page 5) Was this a good analysis?
  7. What did you think about Enzo’s analysis of his death?  He said about Denny, “He needs me to free him to be brilliant.”  (page 5)
  8. The author wrote, “A true hero is flawed.  The true test of a champion is not whether he can triumph, but whether he can overcome obstacles – preferably of his own making – in order to triumph.”  (page 135)  Do you agree?  What do you think about the obstacles “being of his own making?”  Can you name anyone who you think is a hero?  Does he or she fit this description?
  9. About a champion, he wrote “It makes one realize that the physicality of our world is a boundary to us only if our will is weak; a true champion can accomplish things that a normal person would think impossible.”  (page 65)  Do you agree?
  10. One of Denny’s favorite statements was “…that which we manifest is before us.”  (page 43)  What did he mean?  Do you agree?
  11. The author stated that women and dogs feel pain the same (“tap directly into the pain” page 62) whereas men “are all filters and deflectors and timed release.”  (page 63)  Is this an accurate description?  Do you think there is a difference in how men, women and dogs experience pain?
  12. Regarding the evil zebra, at the end Enzo realizes that the zebra is,“not something outside of us.  The zebra is something inside of us.  Our fears.  Our own self-destructive nature.  The zebra is the worst part of us when we are face-to-face with our worst times.  The demon is us!”  (page 264)  Do you agree?  Can you think of any examples from other books you have read where the characters were their own worst enemies?
  13. There were many comments in the book about life in general.  What comparisons were made between driving a race car and life?  Can you add others?
 
Happy Reading!

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